IAT-235: 01 What is Information

IAT-235: 01 What is Information — A slide deck

SIAT Mixer

What is Information?

A welcome to IAT-235

Close All Laptops

Please!

You are allowed to bring them, as we will occassionally have things to discuss online, but they are not allowed to be open whilst I am talking at the front. Please sit in the back row if you absolutely need it.

Andrew Hawryshkewich

Lecturer

Reachable at:

  • Office hours — Tuesdays from 9-10am and Thursdays from 9-10am at the Surrey campus mezzanine.
  • ac.ufs@h.werdna
  • Room 2816, Podium 2, SFU Surrey
  • 778.782.9747

Elgin-Skye McLaren

TA for D101/D102

Reachable at: ac.ufs@neralcme

Ethan Soutar-Rau

TA for D103/D104

Reachable at: ac.ufs@rratuose

This Term's Goal

This term we will be working with the City of Vancouver's Election Outreach Team to develop materials to inform and engage citizens about the upcoming municipal election

Objectives:

  1. Provide accessible & timely information
  2. Improve engagement with low voting communities & demographics
  3. Reduce barriers for voters

City of Vancouver

The Good Information Designer

Doesn't flee from a problem

  1. Understands the information
  2. Knows their audience
  3. Can make information accessible for the audience

Email Rules

What you must include

Requirements for response:

  1. Your full name.
  2. The course number (IAT-235).
  3. Your lab number (i.e. D101, D104).
  4. Your student number.
  5. A clearly articulated question.

Warning: No email crits

It is unfair for both us and yourself if we begin to offer the option of providing critiques via email. If you are looking for feedback on some work, please visit office hours or arrange a meeting to do so.

Lectures

What to expect:

  • Me talking
  • Visual samples
  • You talking
  • Discussions
  • A break
  • Later in term; coding basics

Taking Notes

If you have not gotten in the habit of taking notes, I highly recommend starting. My lecture slides will not reiterate what I say word-for-

Labs

What to expect

  1. Crits, crits and more crits
  2. Group crits
  3. An intro to Axure
  4. An intro to HTML + CSS
  5. Super-awesome support

Canvas

Our course-site

you encounter any issues, or have any questions, please feel free to ask.

iat235.andrewh.ca

Warning: Not a software course

While we do cover some wireframing software and web software to some depth, teaching software is not the primary focus of this course. Please be prepared to spend a bit of time outside of class working on your skills (to pay the bills).

This being said, I am always happy to discuss software or technical considerations should you have any questions or concerns.

Readings

Readings are available entirely digitally. If I sense that the reading has not been sufficiently completed, a quiz may be called.

Participation

The 'random' checks

There will be random, unannounced or somewhat-announced checks for participation through the term both in-lab and in-lecture. It is your responsibility to make sure you are in attendance and participating.

5% of your final grade.

Quizzes

Those terrifying things

There will be three quizzes in this course.

The first two will cover the readings, and will either be announced or unannounced, pending how many of you do the readings. The final quiz will be on HTML/CSS, and will require that you solve a coding problem live in lecture.

20% of your final grade.

Projects

They move from static, to interactive, to responsive. Four in total:

  1. Information Design — 15% (Individual)
  2. Wires — 20% (Group)
  3. HTML/CSS — 10% (Individual)
  4. Web — 30% (Group)

75% of your final grade.

Group Work

A quick note

P02 and P04 will be done in groups. As warning in advance, a significant number of your process deliverables are graded separately. Remember, you are responsible for your own work.

Team contracts are also used in this course.

The First Half

What we'll be doing

In the first half we're going to focus on getting you to deal with information.

This includes:

  • Asking questions of and presenting information
  • Information graphics
  • Looking at context and content
  • Information architecting
  • Wireframing and layout

The Second Half

What we'll be doing

In the second half, we're going to get you coding and delivering information effectively.

This includes:

  • Web coding basics (CSS/HTML)
  • Working with interaction
  • Responsive design
  • User experience
"What happens when the internet escapes from behind glass, stops being on screens and starts being in physical things?"
Joe Malia
A blizzard of snow
How do you react to a blizzard?
A fellow guiding his sled-dogs down a snowy street
How we'll respond to a blizzard (aka. coding)

Plagiarism

This course has a zero tolerance policy for plagiarism on projects. If you are found presenting work that is not your own or resubmitting old work without notice, you will receive a failing grade on that project. No exceptions.

Late or Problematic Submissions

Late submissions receive 10% per day late.

Problematic submissions — i.e. we can't open the PDF or the wrong files were submitted — receive an immediate 30% off plus late penalties on the resubmission.

What is an A?

An A is exceeding expectations. Our expectations are set out in project rubrics.

All Courses Are Equal

Just a quick, friendly reminder

If you feel you are being overworked by one course in particular, let the instructor know. You have more sway then you may think.

When Serious Issues Arise

Get in touch with Andrew

I am amenable to coming up with agreements, but I have to know that a problem has arisen first. Come and see me if an issue comes up that may seriously impede your ability to work on the course.

10 Things

What were they?

What were the ten things required you know to pass this course?

What is Information?

Information 'components'

  • The message
  • The forms we choose
  • Us (humans)
A computer desktop with lots of windows open
"Multitasking"
Different scales of letter and distances at which they can be read effectively
Legibility
Icons of various building amenities
Isotype by Gerd Arntz
Icon of a police car
Icon of a female studentIcon of a male student
Visual instructions for a personal defibrilator
Instructions for a defibrillator.
A sign stating 'If you hit this sign, you will hit that bridge'
The 2012 New York Transit map
2012 New York City Transit Map
Info-graphic illustrating how to make a kid's book
How to Make a Kid's Book by Nicholas Blechman
A visualization of browsing history through favicons
Iconic History by Shan Huang
Various examples of information design in a traditional and non-traditional sense (i.e. wearable performance display for athletes)
Selections from Thoughts on Designing Information (Gobert & Van Looveren, 2014)
P01: Information Design
Raw data from a spreadsheet
The raw spreadsheet
A visualization showing a comparison of media-inflamed fears
Mountains Out of Molehills by David McCandless
Redesigned information pill bottles for Target
Selections from Infographics Designers' Sketchbooks (Heller & Landers, 2014)

This week's labs

The low-down

  • An introduction to one another
  • P01 introduction and work-time
  • Starting with information
  • Bring writing paper+pen!

Next Week's Lecture

Next week we will talk about context in design, as well as the content and design of information.

Contacting Andrew

Lecturer

Reachable at:

  • Office hours — Tuesdays from 9-10am and Thursdays from 9-10am at the Surrey campus mezzanine.
  • ac.ufs@h.werdna
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